pasta

Fresh Garden Pea + Kale Pesto Pasta

Garden pea and kale pesto pasta | Hello Victoria

Now, I think it’s pretty safe to assume that everyone likes pasta. (I mean, unless you’re celiac that is.) It’s always so warm and delicious… but often leaves me feeling a bit guilty. It’s not exactly health food, is it?

So when I saw this recipe from Waitrose, it felt like the perfect marriage of guilty pasta and veggies! This pesto is so vibrant and fresh tasting, with the garden peas… while also still feeling like a traditional pesto, with garlic and basil. It’s delicious, but also feels almost healthy.

Garden pea and kale pesto pasta | Hello Victoria

The perfect recipe to enjoy after spending the day gardening in the allotment 🙂 Which is pretty much what we do every weekend!

So if you’re looking for a quick meal on a weeknight, this is the jam! And you can easily swap out the kale for spinach, or another similar green. In fact, I actually prefer the flavor with the spinach as opposed to kale. It’s subtler, which allows the pea and basil to really shine.

If you’re the type to keep frozen peas on hand, it’s an easy fridge meal. That is, if you’re the type who keeps spinach or kale on hand. 😉 Enjoy!

Garden pea and kale pesto pasta | Hello Victoria

Fresh Garden Pea + Kale Pesto Pasta

Ingredients
  

  • 320 g frozen peas
  • 150 g kale stems removed (or spinach)
  • large handful basil
  • 30 g toasted pine nuts
  • 2 garlic cloves minced
  • 3 tbsp grated parmesan plus more to serve
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 300-500 g pasta
  • chilli flakes lemon juice, salt, to taste

Instructions
 

  • Place the peas in a bowl, and cover with just boiled water. Let sit for 30 seconds, then drain and rinse in cold water.
  • Blanche the kale/spinach in boiling, salted water for 1 minute. Drain, and pat dry.
  • Transfer the peas, kale, garlic, nuts, parmesan cheese, and a healthy pinch of salt to a food processor. Mix until everything is chopped, and drizzle in just enough oil to keep it moving.
  • Add a splash of lemon juice and a sprinkle of chilli flakes, to taste. Add any more salt if desired.
  • Cook the pasta according to the package directions, and drain, reserving a ladle of the pasta water.
  • Add a splash of the pasta water into the pesto, and whizz to combine. Stir together the pasta, and pesto, adding more water to give it a silky texture. Taste, and serve with extra parmesan or chilli flakes.

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Beetroot Ravioli: Making your own Striped Pasta

Beetroot ravioli recipe | Hello Victoria

When I used to work in Vancouver, BC, my office was right near Granville Island. Every now and then, when I forgot my lunch, I would wander over to the Granville Public Market to see what took my fancy. One of the stalls I always stopped to admire, was the fresh pasta from Duso’s. The flavour combinations were always inventive, and they would add stripes to their pasta! Ever since seeing them, I have wanted to make my own striped pasta.

A few years back, I was given a pasta roller as a Christmas present. It was a most unexpected gift, as it was from a secret santa exchange, and I didn’t know the person who had my name very well. It was absolutely perfect, as I had been dying to try my hand at making fresh pasta! And once you’ve mastered making plain pasta, striped or coloured pasta isn’t very far off! It’s not any more difficult, but it is time consuming – oh so time consuming…

How to make striped pasta | Hello Victoria

Making fresh ravioli is only really worth it if you’re going to make unusual flavours. It takes so much time, that’s it’s not worth making regular cheese or spinach pasta. You have to mix together the dough, allow it to rest, make the filling, roll out the dough, fold + roll some more, then fill and cut the ravioli. Honestly, sometimes I’m not sure if I’m a masochist, or just love to cook and bake. It’s up for debate. 😉

To make your pasta striped, you have to mix together both regular dough, as well as coloured. While you could use food colouring, good coloured pasta is made with natural ingredients. Cocoa powder makes brown, beetroot powder for red/pink, spirulina powder for green, tumeric or saffron for yellow, and tomato paste for orange. All of those ingredients have intense enough colours, so you only need a little bit.  It means that they won’t alter the flavour of your pasta considerably. (But remember, the colour of the pasta will lighten when you boil them.)

How to make striped pasta | Hello Victoria

As I was making beetroot filled pasta, I opted to add beetroot powder to 1/4 of the dough recipe, substituting for 5-10g of the flour. It gave it a lovely bright fuschia colour. You’ll need to experiment to see how much colour ingredient you need to get your desired shade.

How to make striped pasta | Hello Victoria

Okay, now the instructions for how to make fresh ravioli (using a roller). It’s a bit of a long explanation, but stay with me! If you already know how, and just want the recipe for the filling, scroll to the bottom! (more…)